Tag Archives: Snow Anchor

WML Assessment Days 3-5

Mark on the summit of Stob Ban

Mark on the summit of Stob Ban

It’s all over except for the result! We had a hard couple of days in the Grey Corries, the weather was challenging to say the least and I found carrying a large bag with bivi kit particularly tough through soft snow. It was a good job that I’ve been in training all winter, carrying both Penny’s and my kit.

Life in the snow hole

Life in the snow hole

Our route was 27km long with 2000m of ascent over the two and a bit days. Tuesday started with a walk in along the disused tramway and then up the valley, we continued to gain height and were soon talking about how we would get groups up onto a ridge. This had a steep section at the top and whilst I demonstrated my movement skills on steep ground Andy had to protect Mark by setting up a belay. After this a few nav legs took us the a point on the ridge where I was asked to take us down into a corrie to the snow hole site. By this point visibility was very poor and it was with some relief that I found a patch of less steep ground more or less where it was supposed to be. However it took a little searching to find the deep snow bank that would be our home for the night.


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Our Route

The snowhole seen from outside

The snowhole seen from outside

Two hours of digging later we had a hole with sitting head room and plenty of space for three of us. Whilst we were cooking Dave (our instructor) confirmed his intention of a 2:30am departure for our night nav and to continue the journey in the direction of the bothy where we could rest during the day. Whilst this sounds harsh his logic made sense, it was forecast to rain and thaw so we wanted to be out of the snow holes before they became slush!

Mark in the snowhole

Mark in the snowhole

2:30 came far too quickly, especially since we had been intending to wake up at 1:45 for breakfast and packing. So with a packet of jelly babies in my pocket and two reluctant contact lenses in I hurriedly packed and we were ready to go at about 2:45. The first leg took us up to the main ridge, Andy led the way but I was asked to lead the group through the cornice. It was about person height in most places but I found a slightly lower section and cut a slot in it. Some big solid steps helped my group to gain the ridge. The rest of the night was a blur of up and down from the ridge but it did involve summitting one Munro in the dark and another in the light.
Grim conditions

Grim conditions

My navigation was on good form and I felt mentally strong. Physically things were worse, jelly babies can only give you short-term energy and I needed proper food, peanuts and cheese. I was very grateful when Mark took a turn breaking trail on one of my legs.

Me enjoying soup in the bothy

Me enjoying soup in the bothy

We also dug some emergency shelters before descending to the bothy. To our surprise we found firelighters, wood and coal in the bothy and it was not long before the fire was going and we were enjoying the breakfast we had missed eight hours earlier. This was followed by a good sleep, lunch, another nap and then dinner. Around 6pm we headed out for a second night nav. This had the advantage of not needing to carry all our bivi kit and by now the rain had stopped and my clothes actually dried during the evening. After good feedback on my nav the previous night I relaxed a little and enjoyed myself. The terrain was more like the Lakes and similar to what I had done with a friend of a friend in preparation for her summer ML assessment.

We got back around 10pm and I went to sleep quickly, the other were chatting to a group of Lads from Sheffield who were having a week away. All that was left was to get up in the morning and walk down the track to the car, about 6km away. I must say it was an exhausting 48 hours, especially the early hours of Wednesday morning. I feel I conducted myself well, and so far the feedback has been mostly positive but the final result will be in a few hours.

Added a little later: I passed! My feedback was mostly very positive and praised my knowledge and navigation skills. I must say that the whole experience was stressful, and hard work. Of course now I’ve passed I’m glad I did it but if you are reading this considering going for your assessment make sure you are well prepared both mentally and physically. Recent practice at all areas of the syllabus is vital as is a commitment to ‘do it properly’ I had two trips to scotland in preparation and several skills sessions in the lakes, if you are not committed you may struggle.

Cairngorms Winter Mountain Leader Practice

Last Friday night I headed up to the Cairngorms for a weekend of practicing the skills I need for my Winter Mountain Leader assessment in two weeks time. I got to Tesco in Aviemore just in time to stock up before heading to the deserted Ciste car park for a windy night in the back of the Berlingo.

Me in the spindrift feeling happy after some precise navigation

Me in the spindrift feeling happy after some precise navigation

My plan for Saturday was to head up via Coire Laogh Mor and micro-navigate over longish legs (500m – 1km). Testing my pacing and bearings. This went fine except for ‘losing’ 100m on one leg. Perhaps I do need some beads to help me with the hundreds. I did find I was able to count subconsciously whilst thinking about other things, this was a little strange but at the end of counting about 4000 double paces I had tuned in the fine adjustments required for different snow conditions or gradients. The weather was not too bad, visibility came and went but was mostly fine it was just the fierce winds and spindrift that required me to wear goggles and a balaclava that was a good test. Continue reading

Snow Anchors and Step Cutting in Hollow Stones

The classic view of Wastwater from the top of Brown Tongue

The classic view of Wastwater from the top of Brown Tongue

Today we were keen to continue exercising and I wanted to have a play in the snow to practice building snow anchors. We decided to head to Hollow Stones, between Scafell and Scafell Pike which I assured Penny would only involve a climb to about 600m. Continue reading